The Pajamaist

The Pajamaist

Matthew Zapruder / Nov 29, 2020

The Pajamaist Zapruder s hip lyricism offers both the slippery comedy and a surprisingly grave ultimately winning commitment to real people emotions locales Publishers Weekly Matthew Zapruder is a young poet re

  • Title: The Pajamaist
  • Author: Matthew Zapruder
  • ISBN: 9781556592447
  • Page: 352
  • Format: Paperback
  • Zapruder s hip lyricism offers both the slippery comedy and a surprisingly grave, ultimately winning, commitment to real people, emotions, locales Publishers Weekly Matthew Zapruder is a young poet reinvigorating American letters In his second collection he engages love, mortality, and life in New York City after 9 11 The title piece, a prose poem synopsis of an unwri Zapruder s hip lyricism offers both the slippery comedy and a surprisingly grave, ultimately winning, commitment to real people, emotions, locales Publishers Weekly Matthew Zapruder is a young poet reinvigorating American letters In his second collection he engages love, mortality, and life in New York City after 9 11 The title piece, a prose poem synopsis of an unwritten novel, turns all literary forms upon themselves with savvy and flair, while the elegy cycle Twenty Poems for Noelle is a compassionate song for a suffering friend.Noelle, somewhere in an apartmentsymphony number twolistens to you breathing.Broken glass in the street.What was once unglowing glows The Pajamaist is an intimate book filled with sly wit and an ever present, infectious openness to amazement Zapruder s poems are urbane and constantly, curiously searching.

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      Posted by:Matthew Zapruder
      Published :2020-08-15T10:35:07+00:00

    About "Matthew Zapruder"

      • Matthew Zapruder

        MATTHEW ZAPRUDER is the author of four collections of poetry His poetry, essays, and translations have appeared in publications including The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Tin House, and The Believer An associate professor in the Saint Mary s College of California MFA program and English department, he is also editor at large at Wave Books and, from 2016 to 2017, was the editor of the poetry page of the New York Times Magazine He lives in Oakland, California, with his wife and son.


    488 Comments

    1. After reading some of the poems back through I'm convinced I prefer Zapruder's more recent work. Come on All You Ghosts is excellent!This volume seemed a bit more internalized, less of a sharing than a meandering. I found it difficult to connect with the poems as well as I could with his later work.My two favorites from The Pajamaist areTonight You'll Be Able (see the author read it and explain where it comes from. It makes it even better.)Haiku (for now, I found it posted to a blog)First few li [...]


    2. Zapruder's poetry makes me feel more human ��� and what I mean by that is not that: "feel more connected to the world or others" sort of feeling. It's more that when I read work from this book: I seem to inhabit myself more. It helps me live within body and mind and that other third part which is undefinable.I recommend picking up a copy from your local independent bookseller, or better yet, from the Copper Canyon Press website: coppercanyonpressWhen you purchase directly from a non-pforit [...]


    3. i couldn't get into this booki tried to get into this book as i've read some nice reviews but could not get into this bookny of the poems in this book were cold and clinical


    4. Really enjoyed this book of poems. A bit hard to get into in the beginning, but I thought the title poem was provocative and captivating. I also loved the poem January, for the below lines:"making an aftersound cave I love to sit inand listen to part of me scaring that part of mewilling to crawl just a bit farther out ontothe sound of ice long after I hear it cracking."Another favorite line comes from the poem Cat Radio, simply, "spring was constructed/precisely to make us/feel like a leaf licke [...]


    5. This took me awhile to read because I have less reading time because I am working extra hours. I miss my reading time!This book is loosely a part of my Reading Local Writers Project, because only because the only time Zapruder lived in Massachusetts is when he got his MFA at University of Massachusetts, Amhearst.I like Zapruder's shorter poems better than the longer ones because they are more "on topic." The longer ones tended to have lines that were all over the page, which I found distracting [...]


    6. Matthew is not only a marvelous person (good-natured, personable, occasionally goofy, fiercely smart), he is also a really giving and really lyric poet - lyric not in the generic sense that often stands in for something close to "pretty," but lyric in the truest sense of musical. Matthew is a musician - I suppose that helps - but you can hear it in the language, which at times has the drawn-out quality of sung verses, at times seems to dance, and feels simultaneously surprising and inevitable, l [...]


    7. It's not Come on All You Ghosts, but this a collection worth returning to. There's a distance here, an effect both of stilted syntax and emotional restraint, that's absent from his next and better collection, but he still managed to grab me with his propensity for belabored adjectival phrases ("Yesterday afternoon/ with a giant like a skyline/ full of nothing but laughter/ emptiness in my mouth.") The heart of the collection is a cycle of 20 20-line poems to Noelle in the wake of 9/11 that stick [...]


    8. This is another book I had to go out and buy after reading it once. This is one of the three best books of poetry I read in the past six months and it seems unfair to compare it with the Selected Poems of writers who have been writing great poetry for decadesr single volume of poetry it's probably the best book I read in the last six months. A potent blend of European and American lyricism and a sublimely open field type of poem that reminds me of the best William Carlos Williams or Rakosi trans [...]


    9. What I admire most in this book are the inventive turns that come from syntax. It creates a sense of joy, and interest, especially in the poems that push at the enjambment. Sometimes the sentence is derailed so that I see differently, sometimes the lineation just makes me see the sentence differently.What I'm critical of, though, is the title poem of the book. I'm not really sure it accomplishes its mock loftiness really matches up with what I think it actually says. I see how it "leads" the oth [...]


    10. matthew just keeps getting better and better (that's the hope we poets all have, isn't it?). i loved his first book, AMERICAN LINDEN and in this one we get that same, familiar voice (full of charm -- all self-deprecation and humor, but beneath it an intense sincerity and a little bit of pain), but in this new book that voice has a new strength and duration. it sits inside its spaces just a little bit longer, feels a little freer to go on into the next level. look at it out there, flying over the [...]


    11. from The Pajamaist by Matthew Zapruder:JanuaryThe small cities touch each other with snow.There's no any longer to miss, only this shadowphonograph still running its shadow needleover and over that after-the-record static,making an aftersound cave I love to sit inand listen to part of me scaring that part of mewilling to crawl just a bit farther out ontothe sound of ice long after I hear it cracking


    12. Matthew Zapruder. Now he should be on everyone's reading list. He's nutso, but in a very very good way. The title poem goes on for pages about people sleeping and sharing pajamas to never have to suffer. It's brilliant! Brilliant! Every poem before and after that one is so unique, from descriptions to even tiny word choices. He had me screaming yes yes yes. Thankfully, I was screaming inside my head.


    13. Nice work Mr. Zapruder. I preferred the poems that played a little less with syntax--that would be a personal preference. Some moments I loved: "I want to communicate with you/ I'm trying as hard as a human" "you give birth to etcetera's" "the town of you know" "Beautiful plagiarist, come/ to me slowly" "Surrounded by motherfuckers/a boy slaps a red handball" "they look/ up the skirt of the/ night sky" "The small cities touch each other with snow."


    14. It's an interesting book if you liked COME ON ALL YE GHOSTS. You can see the kernel of that book's style here. At the same time, some of these poems border on opaque, and I prefer the more conversational or inclusive poems that come from the later collection. P.S. "Twenty Poems for Noelle" is pretty fantastic.


    15. Digressive and meandering. Often I stopped after about 10 lines of a poem and thought, "how did I get here?" and started over. It didn't always help. Perhaps I needed to spend more time with each line, but I kept reading and waiting for something to catch my eye or ear.The title poem is based on a pretty interesting idea, which was interesting, but even in that I was waiting for more.


    16. I read these poems today and yesterday while sitting under the deck on the metal lounge chair. i read while drinking a cup of coffee, another cup of coffee, and a beer. The last line in the poem Tonight You'll Be Able set my brain on fire.


    17. I read this book in my pajamas, not because of the title, but because the New Yorker had an article last week about some neuroscientists who are attempting to figure out how insight works in our brains. They said we are most open to insight in the morning when we first wake up.


    18. Book 19 of 2016. Poetry. "I'm sure I can seeeach week the teamgrowing increasinglytender holdingthe small thrushes they probably had to name.Go, Jerry, soon you will bein Canada whereNeil Young was born."







    19. some nice stuff, but i wasn't as consistently wowed as i expected and wanted to be. but the moments that pop really pop big time.



    20. The "Poems for Noelle" were good, I think. Also, there were scattered observations or lines in many poems that made me smile.




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