Being Black, Living in the Red: Race, Wealth, and Social Policy in America

Being Black, Living in the Red: Race, Wealth, and Social Policy in America

Dalton Conley / Apr 22, 2021

Being Black Living in the Red Race Wealth and Social Policy in America What is important race or class in determining the socioeconomic success of the blacks and whites born since the civil rights triumphs of the s When compared to whites African Americans complete

  • Title: Being Black, Living in the Red: Race, Wealth, and Social Policy in America
  • Author: Dalton Conley
  • ISBN: 9780520216730
  • Page: 477
  • Format: Paperback
  • What is important race or class in determining the socioeconomic success of the blacks and whites born since the civil rights triumphs of the 1960s When compared to whites, African Americans complete less formal schooling, work fewer hours at a lower rate of pay and are likely to give birth to a child out of wedlock and to rely on welfare Are these differencesWhat is important race or class in determining the socioeconomic success of the blacks and whites born since the civil rights triumphs of the 1960s When compared to whites, African Americans complete less formal schooling, work fewer hours at a lower rate of pay and are likely to give birth to a child out of wedlock and to rely on welfare Are these differences attributable to race per se, or are they the result of differences in socioeconomic background between the two groups Being Black, Living in the Red demonstrates that many differences between blacks and whites stem not from race but from economic inequalities that have accumulated over the course of American history Property ownership as measured by net worth reflects this legacy of economic oppression The racial discrepancy in wealth holdings leads to advantages for whites in the form of better schools, desirable residences, higher wages, and opportunities to save, invest, and thereby further their economic advantages.Dalton Conley shows how factoring parental wealth into a reconceptualization of class can lead to a different future for race policy in the United States As it currently stands, affirmative action programs primarily address racial diversity in schooling and work areas that Conley contends generate paradoxical results with respect to racial equity Instead he suggests an affirmative action policy that fosters minority property accumulation, thereby encouraging long term wealth equity, or one that while continuing to address schooling and work is based on social class as defined by family wealth levels rather than on race.

    • Best Read [Dalton Conley] ☆ Being Black, Living in the Red: Race, Wealth, and Social Policy in America || [Suspense Book] PDF »
      477 Dalton Conley
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Dalton Conley] ☆ Being Black, Living in the Red: Race, Wealth, and Social Policy in America || [Suspense Book] PDF »
      Posted by:Dalton Conley
      Published :2021-01-26T10:15:33+00:00

    About "Dalton Conley"

      • Dalton Conley

        Dalton Conley Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Being Black, Living in the Red: Race, Wealth, and Social Policy in America book, this is one of the most wanted Dalton Conley author readers around the world.


    445 Comments

    1. In a nutshell, this book is about the effect wealth (not just income) has in determining who will finish school, who will find steady work, and who will (or won't) be poor. It demonstrates how difficult it can be to determine causation, and to tease out the roles played by race or class. Sometimes the two are pretty damn near inextricably linked. Basically, the amount of wealth your parents have seems to be a pretty decent predictor of how much wealth you will have. (And black parents generally [...]


    2. Important. Formative. Any conversation that even glances at race in America without acknowledging the history and dynamics studied in this book is woefully lacking.



    3. This is an interesting, if dry, look at the influence of wealth on educational, professional, family, and other sociological outcomes. Conflating income and wealth has long been a pet peeve of mine, so this book, which is principally focused on entangling these two things (the author focuses on racial differences, but the income/wealth distinction has other implications, too), resonated with me.The most compelling finding is that after controlling for wealth levels, income is not significant in [...]


    4. Dalton Conley is part of the reason I'm pursuing a career in planninghis discussion of the relationship between race and class, and how people misunderstand each of them, is life-changing. He also discusses how parental education and assets so deeply affect the achievement potentials of their children. I found myself totally and utterly agreeing with everything he said.



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