The Great Depression: 1929-1939

The Great Depression: 1929-1939

Pierre Berton / Feb 24, 2021

The Great Depression Over million Canadians were on relief one in five was a public dependant and young men travelled like hoboes Ordinary citizens were rioting in the streets but their demonstrations met wi

  • Title: The Great Depression: 1929-1939
  • Author: Pierre Berton
  • ISBN: 9780385658430
  • Page: 396
  • Format: Paperback
  • Over 1.5 million Canadians were on relief, one in five was a public dependant, and 70,000 young men travelled like hoboes Ordinary citizens were rioting in the streets, but their demonstrations met with indifference, and dissidents were jailed Canada emerged from the Great Depression a different nation.The most searing decade in Canada s history began with the stock markOver 1.5 million Canadians were on relief, one in five was a public dependant, and 70,000 young men travelled like hoboes Ordinary citizens were rioting in the streets, but their demonstrations met with indifference, and dissidents were jailed Canada emerged from the Great Depression a different nation.The most searing decade in Canada s history began with the stock market crash of 1929 and ended with the Second World War With formidable story telling powers, Berton reconstructs its engrossing events vividly the Regina Riot, the Great Birth Control Trial, the black blizzards of the dust bowl and the rise of Social Credit The extraordinary cast of characters includes Prime Minister Mackenzie King, who praised Hitler and Mussolini but thought Winston Churchill one of the most dangerous men I have ever known Maurice Duplessis, who padlocked the homes of private citizens for their political opinions and Tim Buck, the Communist leader who narrowly escaped murder in Kingston Penitentiary.In this 1 best selling book, Berton proves that Canada s political leaders failed to take the bold steps necessary to deal with the mass unemployment, drought and despair A child of the era, he writes passionately of people starving in the midst of plenty.

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      Published :2020-07-06T19:49:15+00:00

    About "Pierre Berton"

      • Pierre Berton

        From narrative histories and popular culture, to picture and coffee table books to anthologies, to stories for children to readable, historical works for youth, many of his books are now Canadian classics.Born in 1920 and raised in the Yukon, Pierre Berton worked in Klondike mining camps during his university years He spent four years in the army, rising from private to captain instructor at the Royal Military College in Kingston He spent his early newspaper career in Vancouver, where at 21 he was the youngest city editor on any Canadian daily He wrote columns for and was editor of Maclean s magazine, appeared on CBC s public affairs program Close Up and was a permanent fixture on Front Page Challenge for 39 years He was a columnist and editor for the Toronto Star, and a writer and host of a series of CBC programs Pierre Berton has received over 30 literary awards including the Governor General s Award for Creative Non Fiction three times , the Stephen Leacock Medal of Humour, and the Gabrielle Leger National Heritage Award He received two Nellies for his work in broadcasting, two National Newspaper awards, and the National History Society s first award for distinguished achievement in popularizing Canadian history For his immense contribution to Canadian literature and history, he has been awarded than a dozen honourary degrees, is a member of the Newsman s Hall of Fame and a Companion of the Order of Canada.


    913 Comments

    1. Pierre Berton was a prolific Canadian author of popular history, authoring over 50 books on subjects as diverse as the Klondike Gold Rush, the War of 1812 and the construction of the national railway. He was also a popular television personality - having conducted the only surviving on-camera interview with Bruce Lee in 1971 and discussed his 40-year long recreational cannabis usage shortly before his death in 2004, showing Canadians how to roll a true joint. Certainly a man of many talents and [...]


    2. It is astonishing to think how easily and enthusiastically a man like King could be hoodwinked by Hitler (1937). It is likewise astonishing that men like Mitch Hepburn, George McCullogh, RB Bennet, William Aberhart and many others have never been brought before us as the villains they really were – men who did not believe in democracy, human rights or much at all outside of their own personal fiscal and political gain. Why are we never taught this dark part of our democratic past? You simply c [...]


    3. A fast and compelling read about the Great Depression in Canada. Berton's outrage makes this history anything but dry.


    4. One day Paul Gross should direct a movie about Mackenzie King's mom and call it Ghost Mom. The school system in Newfoundland did a terrible job of educating me about Canadian history. I suspect this is also true in other provinces, Canadians are in general ignorant to our past. And it's a shame because it's riveting stuff. This is my third Pierre Berton book and it won't be my last. The way he captures history in an exciting, chronological narrative makes a subject many might view as boring anyt [...]


    5. There was a lot of information here I didn't knoww that I think about it, I didn't really learn much about the Great Depression in school. One would think a child of my generation should've been taught about a decade that affected the lives of our grandparents so deeply. From this and other books I've read I get the impression that it was worse here in Canada than it was in the US due to governmental bungling. Berton's political slant shines through here, as it does in all his books, for better [...]


    6. Burton is one of my favourite authors, so there's almost nothing of his I haven't read. I think I'd held off reading this one because a decade of economic depression didn't sound nearly as interesting as war, or even political analysis. However, as with his other books, I gained significant insights into the forces that shaped my country today. It was well worth it. My only complaint, if any, was that I believe he could have communicated the same history and perspectives more succinctly.


    7. I'm a huge fan of Berton, not only for his Canadian history books, but the fact that he was a great Canadian who is too forgotten today. Unlike many of his books though, The Great Depression is a bit slanted. Berton lived through that decade as a young person, and his personal viewpoint seems to enter into things a bit too often. I prefer Barry Broadfoot's Ten Lost Years when it comes to a Canadian version of the Depression.


    8. I've often said it will take me the rest of my life to get over being the child of a child of the depression. My parents' Depression era experiences have reverberated through the generations. Now I understand what they and their parents went through. This book should be required high school reading.


    9. I was lent this book to read and trudged through it. I found it very dry, almost like a polotics text book but in hind sight I'm so glad I read it. I learned lots about how Canadians lived in the great depression and could only think of my grandparents and how they were affected by it. The last part of the book I was not enjoying it anymore but finished it as I wanted to know how it ended.


    10. Figured I had to read SOME Pierre Berton.Prepared for drudgery I was pleasantly surprised to find a dynamic writer worth the acclaim I think I was thinking historians were dry and objective He is passionate and scathing


    11. I grew up hearing my Grandmother speak of her experiences on her farm during the great depression, but reading this was eye-opening to how horrific the situation was. Grab some Kleenex if you choose to read this book!


    12. Very heavy on the politics and political analysis. I was hoping for more of a social history. You do get that, but not nearly enough. Still, a very compelling history of the Depression, and quite readable.





    13. I'm a sucker for books on the Depression, and this one is exceptionally good. It's particularly good on labor organizing and the Mackenzie King prime ministership.




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