The Path Is the Goal: A Basic Handbook of Buddhist Meditation

The Path Is the Goal: A Basic Handbook of Buddhist Meditation

Chögyam Trungpa / Feb 26, 2021

The Path Is the Goal A Basic Handbook of Buddhist Meditation According to the Buddha no one can attain basic sanity or enlightenment without practicing meditation The teachings given here on the outlook and technique of meditation provide the foundation that e

  • Title: The Path Is the Goal: A Basic Handbook of Buddhist Meditation
  • Author: Chögyam Trungpa
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 131
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • According to the Buddha, no one can attain basic sanity or enlightenment without practicing meditation The teachings given here on the outlook and technique of meditation provide the foundation that every practitioner needs to awaken as the Buddha did Trungpa teaches us to let go of the urge to make meditation serve our ambition thus we can relax into openness We are sAccording to the Buddha, no one can attain basic sanity or enlightenment without practicing meditation The teachings given here on the outlook and technique of meditation provide the foundation that every practitioner needs to awaken as the Buddha did Trungpa teaches us to let go of the urge to make meditation serve our ambition thus we can relax into openness We are shown how the deliberate practice of mindfulness develops into contrived awareness, and we discover the world of insight that awareness reveals We learn of a subtle psychological stage set that we carry with us everywhere and unwittingly use to structure all our experience and we find that meditation gradually carries us beyond this and beyond ego altogether to the experience of unconditioned freedom.

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      Published :2020-08-04T00:43:58+00:00

    About "Chögyam Trungpa"

      • Chögyam Trungpa

        Vidyadhara Ch gyam Trungpa Rinpoche Tibetan Wylie Chos rgyam Drung pa also known as Dorje Dradul of Mukpo, Surmang Trungpa, after his monastery, or Ch kyi Gyatso, of which Ch gyam is an abbreviation was a Buddhist meditation master, scholar, teacher, poet, and artist He was the 11th descendent in the line of Trungpa tulkus of the Kagy school of Tibetan Buddhism He was also trained in the Nyingma tradition, the oldest of the four schools, and was an adherent of the rimay or non sectarian movement within Tibetan Buddhism, which aspired to bring together and make available all the valuable teachings of the different schools, free of sectarian rivalry.Trungpa was a significant figure in the dissemination of Tibetan Buddhism to the West, founding Naropa University and establishing the Shambhala Training method, a presentation of the Buddhadharma largely devoid of ethnic trappings In 1963, he moved to England to study comparative religion, philosophy, and fine arts at Oxford University During this time, he also studied Japanese flower arranging and received an instructors degree from the Sogetsu school of ikebana In 1967, he moved to Scotland, where he founded the Samye Ling meditation centre.Shortly thereafter, a variety of experiences including a car accident that left him partially paralyzed on the left side of his body led him to give up his monastic vows and work as a lay teacher In 1969, he published Meditation in Action, the first of fourteen books on the spiritual path published during his lifetime The following year he married Diana Pybus and moved to the United States, where he established his first North American meditation centre, Tail of the Tiger now known as Karm Ch ling in Barnet, Vermont.In 1986, he moved to Nova Scotia, Canada, where hundreds of his students had settled That Autumn, after years of heavy alcohol use, he had a cardiac arrest, and he died of heart failure the following Spring His legacy is carried on by his son, Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, under the banner of Shambhala International and the Nalanda Translation Committee.


    958 Comments

    1. He doesn't pull any punches: Another reviewer harshly criticized Chogyam Trungpa's lack of compassion with respect to the meditation practices and the non-dualism that they promote. While I would concur that the Rinpoche's style is very straightforward, I do not believe that is the result of a lack of compassion or any extra "harshness" on the his part.His writings are direct, and concise. I find that his writing style very much belies his primary language and the translation is almost exact, ph [...]


    2. The language is rather straightforward, but this does not mean the philosophy of mind and meditation described is easier to understand - but it gets you closer. Some of the language is dated given the author sometimes uses the vernacular popular during the 1970s (the book is basically a transcript of Q&A periods between students and Trungpa during two retreats). He is sometimes rather funny comparing our mind to that of a dog exploring the world by sniffing everything he sees and smells (tho [...]


    3. Since I will probably never afford to attend a Buddhist retreat with a great Buddhist teacher like Chögyam Trungpa, I am grateful for reading this book, which is basically the transcript of such a retreat, complete with the questions asked him from his students and his thoughtful--and sometimes playful--answers. Although not as complete as other works from Trungpa, The Path Is the Goal is going to get my butt back on the mat where is belongs after a long time away.


    4. A collection of lectures on meditation and how this cornerstone practice can develop into awareness, insight, and openness. Trungpa warns against using meditation to obtain specific goals or ambitions. Generally a good book, though I would have liked a more practical and less theoretical /  esoterical tone better.


    5. A transcription of lectures and Q&A with his students from a seminar about Buddhist meditation. It was interesting to hear Trungpa's responses to student questions but there are better books out there for learning this subject [including others by this author]. Probably of most interest to Trungpa fans and scholars.


    6. I don't really think this is the ideal book for the beginning mediator despite the subtitle. The book is a compilation of lectures each of which is followed by a question and answer session. For most of the lectures I found the questions and answers to be as helpful, if not more helpful than the actual lectures.


    7. I love this book for its profound and pragmatic description of the meditation technique, as well as for it's good-natured insight into both the neurotic and wise aspects of mind. One of my favorites by Chogyam Trungpa.


    8. this book, this author, all very helpful. it seems that almost everything Chogyam trungpa did put into words things that were in my mind but i could not form the words. if you want a good no nonsense intro in meditation than this book is it.


    9. This book is both a personal guide and a historical treasure for establishing critical East-meets-West context to span (and spawn) the development of many different fields of cultural, philosophical and contemplative study in America.


    10. L'auteur présente une possibilité. Libre a nous de l'explorer. En tout cas je suis convaincue et j'ai envie de tester. Pas de glamour dans ce libre et ça fait du bien. Non l'éveil ne fait pas maigrir et ne rend pas les cheveux doux et brillants. Oui la méditation c'est difficile et desagreable


    11. Great lectures with practical advice on how to approach “meditation”- such a loaded word these days. Trungpa describes what it is and what it is not, where we can get side tracked and trip urselves up or trip out. He describes the full boredom of meditation and intentionally moves away from any kind of gimmick or promise of relief, happiness, enlightenment, etc.



    12. For the most part Trungpa tries to emphasise not overthinking Buddhist practice, but the students' questions at the end of each lecture seem to ignore this and are constantly only interested in the theory behind the practice. This reminded me of a Buddhist parable criticizing this attitude: a warrior was shot with an arrow during battle, and a doctor came along to help, however before he would accept any help, the warrior first wanted to know what material the arrow was made of, which specific m [...]


    13. Short, concise and to the point. This is book is really a transcript of two seminars held by Trungpa in the US and as such lacks the completeness of a book on the subject, but offers Trungpa's direct and deep insight never the less.



    14. Great information on meditation. Accessible, and profound in Chogyam Trungpa's typically straightforward and easy style.


    15. Harder than it sounds and occasionally laugh out loud funny. Will have to read a couple more times to really internalize itread Nov 25-26, 2017


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