The Asian American Achievement Paradox

The Asian American Achievement Paradox

Jennifer Lee Min Zhou / Apr 22, 2021

The Asian American Achievement Paradox Asian Americans are often stereotyped as the model minority Their sizeable presence at elite universities and high household incomes have helped construct the narrative of Asian American exceptionalis

  • Title: The Asian American Achievement Paradox
  • Author: Jennifer Lee Min Zhou
  • ISBN: 9780871545473
  • Page: 226
  • Format: Paperback
  • Asian Americans are often stereotyped as the model minority Their sizeable presence at elite universities and high household incomes have helped construct the narrative of Asian American exceptionalism While many scholars and activists characterize this as a myth, pundits claim that Asian Americans educational attainment is the result of unique cultural values In TAsian Americans are often stereotyped as the model minority Their sizeable presence at elite universities and high household incomes have helped construct the narrative of Asian American exceptionalism While many scholars and activists characterize this as a myth, pundits claim that Asian Americans educational attainment is the result of unique cultural values In The Asian American Achievement Paradox, sociologists Jennifer Lee and Min Zhou offer a compelling account of the academic achievement of the children of Asian immigrants Drawing on in depth interviews with the adult children of Chinese immigrants and Vietnamese refugees and survey data, Lee and Zhou bridge sociology and social psychology to explain how immigration laws, institutions, and culture interact to foster high achievement among certain Asian American groups.For the Chinese and Vietnamese in Los Angeles, Lee and Zhou find that the educational attainment of the second generation is strikingly similar, despite the vastly different socioeconomic profiles of their immigrant parents Because immigration policies after 1965 favor individuals with higher levels of education and professional skills, many Asian immigrants are highly educated when they arrive in the United States They bring a specific success frame, which is strictly defined as earning a degree from an elite university and working in a high status field This success frame is reinforced in many local Asian communities, which make resources such as college preparation courses and tutoring available to group members, including their low income members.While the success frame accounts for part of Asian Americans high rates of achievement, Lee and Zhou also find that institutions, such as public schools, are crucial in supporting the cycle of Asian American achievement Teachers and guidance counselors, for example, who presume that Asian American students are smart, disciplined, and studious, provide them with extra help and steer them toward competitive academic programs These institutional advantages, in turn, lead to better academic performance and outcomes among Asian American students Yet the expectations of high achievement come with a cost the notion of Asian American success creates an achievement paradox in which Asian Americans who do not fit the success frame feel like failures or racial outliers.While pundits ascribe Asian American success to the assumed superior traits intrinsic to Asian culture, Lee and Zhou show how historical, cultural, and institutional elements work together to confer advantages to specific populations An insightful counter to notions of culture based on stereotypes, The Asian American Achievement Paradox offers a deft and nuanced understanding of how and why certain immigrant groups succeedNNIFER LEE is professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine.MIN ZHOU is professor of sociology at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, and the University of California, Los Angeles.

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    About "Jennifer Lee Min Zhou"

      • Jennifer Lee Min Zhou

        Jennifer Lee Min Zhou Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Asian American Achievement Paradox book, this is one of the most wanted Jennifer Lee Min Zhou author readers around the world.


    281 Comments

    1. I learned a good deal more about Asian-American and mainstream American perceptions of success than I really expected to from this book. I though I had a fairly good handle on my upbringing, my community, and why my peers and I had the expectations we did growing up in the Asian-dominated San Gabriel Valley, but this book actually gave me entirely new perspectives that I hadn't considered - namely, why was it that I, a Chinese-American from a lower-class, single parent background, was able to ac [...]


    2. Though this book doesn't tell me anything I didn't know, I sure had a lot of fun reading it. A feeling Hermione must've had when she took that course on Muggles.


    3. I thank the authors, profusely, for giving me the new term "success frame". It's all but self-explanatory, and it instantly clarifies certain kinds of conversations.Their sociological narrative is tight and fascinating, and I won't summarize it any better than they did themselves in the description. One crucial point that should have been obvious to me, but wasn't, because privilege: The Asian American success frame's emphasis on quantitative fields is a direct response to White supremacy. "One [...]


    4. As someone who has never read or taken any classes on Asian-American studies before, this was probably the most enlightening book I've ever read. So much of my upbringing makes sense now! The middle class hyperselectivity, narrow success frames, coethnic networking, the whole "being smart is just an Asian thing" - all these factors ingrained throughout my entire life were explained in clear and logical sociological analysis. I also appreciated that the authors used case studies and interviews in [...]



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