Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior

Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior

Jonah Berger / Oct 21, 2020

Invisible Influence The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior The New York Times bestselling author of Contagious explores the subtle secret influences that affect the decisions we make from what we buy to the careers we choose to what we eat in this fascinat

  • Title: Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior
  • Author: Jonah Berger
  • ISBN: 9781508211426
  • Page: 275
  • Format: Audiobook
  • The New York Times bestselling author of Contagious explores the subtle, secret influences that affect the decisions we make from what we buy, to the careers we choose, to what we eat in this fascinating and groundbreaking work.If you re like most people, you think that your choices and behaviors are driven by your individual, personal tastes, and opinions You wear a certThe New York Times bestselling author of Contagious explores the subtle, secret influences that affect the decisions we make from what we buy, to the careers we choose, to what we eat in this fascinating and groundbreaking work.If you re like most people, you think that your choices and behaviors are driven by your individual, personal tastes, and opinions You wear a certain jacket because you liked the way it looked You picked a particular career because you found it interesting The notion that our choices are driven by our own personal thoughts and opinions is patently obvious Right Wrong.Without our realizing it, other people s behavior has a huge influence on everything we do at every moment of our lives, from the mundane to the momentous occasion Even strangers have a startling impact on our judgments and decisions our attitudes toward a welfare policy shift if we re told it is supported by Democrats versus Republicans even though the policy is the same in both cases.But social influence doesn t just lead us to do the same things as others In some cases we conform, or imitate others around us But in other cases we diverge, or avoid particular choices or behaviors because other people are doing them We stop listening to a band because they go mainstream We skip buying the minivan because we don t want to look like a soccer mom.In his surprising and compelling Invisible Influence, Jonah Berger integrates research and thinking from business, psychology, and social science to focus on the subtle, invisible influences behind our choices as individuals By understanding how social influence works, we can decide when to resist and when to embrace it and how we can use this knowledge to make better informed decisions and exercise control over our own behavior.

    • Best Read [Jonah Berger] ✓ Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior || [Sports Book] PDF ☆
      275 Jonah Berger
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      Posted by:Jonah Berger
      Published :2020-07-04T13:14:28+00:00

    About "Jonah Berger"

      • Jonah Berger

        Jonah Berger is a marketing professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and bestselling author of Contagious Why Things Catch On and Invisible Influence The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior.Dr Berger has spent over 15 years studying how social influence works and how it drives products and ideas to catch on He s published dozens of articles in top tier academic journals, consulted for a variety of Fortune 500 companies, and popular outlets like the New York Times and Harvard Business Review often cover his work.


    445 Comments

    1. I received this via NetGalley and admit I didn't finish it.I liked the first 20%. The concept of mimicry is excellent. It's that we mimic those around us.At the 30% mark I realized that there's very little research to support the stories. By 35% I was skimming.Forty percent - should I finish it?And 50%, I was done.There are lots of stories about college students and their behaviors. Occasionally research studies were referenced. Maybe this was too pop psychology for me? It was lots of broad demo [...]


    2. A very fast read but lacking in substance compared to Contagious. These genres of books tend to blend together. Same stories, different angle. Not a lot of new here.


    3. I received this book for free through ' Giveaways programs.The premise of Jonah Berger's book is intriguing-- we don't make decisions that are truly our own. Instead, we are constantly relying on input from others without fully realizing it. This book struck me an entertaining, somewhat "pop" psychology book that had some interesting information (who knew that youngest children are usually the most likely to be top athletes?). But overall, I thought it was pretty bland. Of course we are influenc [...]


    4. Li esperando comentários sobre o trabalho dele com influência e mídias sociais, mas não foi bem o que encontrei. O livro tem boas histórias sobre o que nos influencia, de valores que queremos ter com os gostos pelo que não queremos ser. Algumas achei um tanto repetitivas, porque já tinha ouvido no O andar do bêbado (músicas, downloads, sorte e a vantagem dos primeiros), enquanto outras ouvi no You May Also Like: Taste in an Age of Endless Choice. Achei um tanto longo e mais extenso do q [...]


    5. I first heard about the author many years ago and decided to take his Coursera marketing module which is based on his other book "Contagious".This one is a fun reading, simple and brief. Influence is such a huge topic and for people who do not have any other previous reading this can be life changing, however, if you have read about Cialdini or other influence/persuasion books there is no much new here.What I really liked is the simplicity of explaining the concepts and fun stories around them, [...]


    6. So disappointing. I was a huge fan of Berger's previous book, "Contagious." (It's actually on my favorites shelf.) This new book lacks the structure and applicability that made his previous book so useful. It also feels overwritten. As though the publisher/editor asked him to stretch out the content a liiiiiittle bit more. Here's an example, "Teenagers are unlikely to be confused with 40-year-old business executives…." All of this filler gets in the way of some of his more interesting points.T [...]


    7. Eu poderia facilmente ficar sentada por dias só lendo/ouvindo o Jonah Berger falar sobre experimentos sociais e marketing. É o segundo livro dele que eu leio e esse foi ainda melhor; tudo é explicado de forma simples para que qualquer pessoa acompanhe e entenda.Um dos favoritos do ano, sem duvidas <3


    8. I loved this book! In line with Malcom Gladwell, I am fascinated by social psychology and what drives humans to do what they do. I enjoyed his scenarios, his stories and his statistics. I found myself plotting how I could use social influence to make better choices, to motivate me, and leverage the now "visible" to work in my favor!


    9. While there are a number of books on this subject, Berger's stands out for its Malcolm Gladwell-like-accessibility and depth of understanding. For those not familiar with the social impact on our day-to-day choices this is an excellent introduction. Frequently, books like this seem geared for corporate drones trying to become slightly more human, Berger avoids those sorts of pitfalls with great humor and brio while also offering ways in which this information could be used effectively for person [...]


    10. Thanks to Netgalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. The writing is good, but the subject is a bit ho-hum. I just kept thinking the information wasn't very ground breaking. Perhaps students of psychology and sociology would appreciate the in-depth discussion of influencing others.


    11. This man needs an editor, or a ghost writer. (I volunteer. I want so badly to fix this.) The topic is interesting, and the information is worth the read, but I kept having to put the book down mid-chapter to recover from all the sentence fragments. Also, he wound up making a couple of arguments that I think he didn't mean: like at the end, when he says children who moved out of poor neighborhoods by age eight were expected to make $300,000 over the course of their careers. He had to have meant " [...]


    12. Jonah describes the variety of forces that influence our decision making. He highlights how pop culture can influence what we are exposed to, from books, music to food. How our siblings can shape our lives. The very presence of people/peers can influence how much effort we put into a certain tasks. How hurricanes can influence the choice of baby names. These are a few of the entertaining examples he sprinkles throughout his book. The book was entertaining and could be a good source of conversati [...]


    13. Overall I thought this was an enjoyable read. At first, I was afraid this would be another "airport book" - a breezy read with lots of anecdotes and little real substance. While it is a quick read, Jonah Berger actually references quite a bit of research. Most importantly, he presents the concept of social influence in a cohesive way, starting with why we are influenced by others, then looking at factors that cause us to deviate from others, then looking at how different environments can be stru [...]


    14. This book reminds me a lot of Predictably Irrational. It gives great insight and perspective to human nature as proven by various studies. Helps us understanding what shapes people's decisions from relationships to purchasing.It's a great read for anyone in the sales/marketing and/or psychology arenas.


    15. Invisible Influencedoes a great job of explaining some behavioral concepts in an approachable way much like Jonah Berger did withContagious . If you haven't read a lot of marketing / behavioral books, than this could be a good start, but by no means is it exhaustive on the idea of theinvisible forcesthat effect our decisions.


    16. The second book I've read by Jonah Berger. While I found Contagious to be, well, contagious, I struggled to finish this one. The examples were satisfactory, though unsurprising. I felt this book could have have been replaced by Freakonomics for many of the examples and none would be the wiser.


    17. We can’t directly see it, smell it, taste it or perhaps describe it but it is there – the invisible, subtle influences that affect the decisions we take. We probably believe that we are rational and are in control of our choices, tastes and opinions but let’s not get overly confident with this… The author sets out to examine literally what makes us tick, how we reach certain decisions and even the impact others, strangers included, can have on our “independent decision-making” proces [...]


    18. The book is a quick read without a lot of academic fancy-pants descriptions, instead it is a straightforward approach to digesting the idea that as social animals, we make decisions socially whether we like to believe it or not. Berger describes purchasing decisions, decisions about "right" or "wrong" based on others' responses, how we sometimes do the opposite of what everyone is doing because they're all doing it, how we want to be unique by saying, "everyone's BMW is silver, mine is blue" the [...]


    19. What I love most about Invisible Influence is how Berger makes science seem simple and interesting by giving everyday examples to support the research that he cites. He presents seemingly contradictory statements about how much individuals are influenced by others, explaining the circumstances under which each social influence “rule” is likely to apply. The supporting cases in each scenario make it easy to see how invisible influence works in our own lives.Topics discussed are the social ten [...]


    20. I end up reading a lot of these kinds of books that are basically repackaged original research (much of it done by other researchers) that is then taken and put a structure around it. The structure allows the author (sometimes a scientist, sometimes a journalist) to tell a story. Hopefully the research helps the story; hopefully the story is interesting and supported by the research. I would not have picked this up off the shelf if it were not for the cover design, a clever cover that from one a [...]


    21. Good book. Here is what I want to remember:(p.59) If people can't see, or observe what others are doing, there is no way for those others to influence themSocial influence only works when other people's opinions or behaviors are observable.(p. 65) Birth order is the biggest predictor of elite athletes: 75% have at least one older sibling.(p.68-69) Sibling rivalry is about who gets to be a certain type of person and who has to be someone elseKids' personalities even seem to shift over time in opp [...]


    22. Added 8/25/16. (Published June 14th 2016.)This book explores "why we act as we do, politically, socially, economically, and emotionally. -Kirkus ReviewsFrom: amazon/gp/product/147 [See this link to read clips from various editorial reviews.]Thought-provoking. This book made me think about why I make certain choices and decisions.Greg's GR review said: "This is about how our social connections affect our behavior in many settings. The author discusses several situations where one person has chang [...]


    23. Reading Invisible Influence makes you aware of, well, the invisible. It's easy to laugh at the 300K watch that doesn't tell time, yet uncomfortable to realize just how deeply our desires to appear like (or unlike) others shape our decisions and opinions. The book is fast and fun to read - and the hardcover has creative cover design.


    24. An interesting overview of the topic of social influence, but doesn't dig very deep or offer a lot of evidence of underpinning. The evidence may be there, it just wasn't given much credit. I found the author's writing style distracting, with sentence fragments galore; still, this was a quick and thought-provoking read.


    25. 3.5 starsTurns out you make many fewer independent decisions than you thought. Peer pressure is a real thingyou just don't realize it. And so is reverse psychology.


    26. Debating between a 3-star and 4. The book is nicely written, easy to follow, with plenty of interesting examples. I think the downside for me is that I didn't get much new from it.


    27. The scope of this book was pretty broad, covering everything from performance in competitions and socio-economic status to how retail stores display merchandise in order to increase sales within specific demographics. I liked that the book was filled with anecdotes that serve to illustrate the concept of each chapter. It was interesting to see just how blind we all are to how influenced we all are by the actions, or non-actions, of others. Again and again, the author shows through studies and su [...]


    28. Это одна из тех книг, после прочтения которой хочется сказать: «Побольше бы таких книг!». Но таких книг очень мало, к сожалению. «Невидимое влияние» Йоны Бергера читал запоем, с большим наслаждением. Рекомендую эту книгу каждому!А сейчас немного о самой книге и о том, что зап [...]


    29. I tend to read books like this one with the expectation that they will reveal some nugget of truth that will help me tremendously at work. I gave this book three stars because I didn't find that nugget, but I confess that my expectations may be unrealistic. Author Jonah Berger writes, "Social influence is neither good or bad. It is hard to recognize its influence on ourselves, but if we can recognize it, we can maintain our individuality and avoid being swept up in a crowd. We can have more fulf [...]


    30. A influencia social é algo realmente muito poderoso. O interessante é que o autor mostra que conseguimos identificar facilmente quando os outros estão sendo influenciados, mas quando se trata de si o efeito não só não é reconhecido como é negado. Muitos argumentam que fazem suas escolhas sem ser influenciados por nada e/ou por ninguém, e o autor vai mostrando através das pesquisas que não é bem assim. As escolhas são influenciadas por desejo de pertencer a um grupo e também pelo de [...]


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