Two by Duras: The Slut of the Normandy Coast / The Atlantic Man

Two by Duras: The Slut of the Normandy Coast / The Atlantic Man

Marguerite Duras Alberto Manguel / Apr 21, 2021

Two by Duras The Slut of the Normandy Coast The Atlantic Man Contains two novellas The slut of the Normandy CoastThe Atlantic manandAn interview with Marguerite Duras by Ana Maria Moix An afterword by Alberto Manguel

  • Title: Two by Duras: The Slut of the Normandy Coast / The Atlantic Man
  • Author: Marguerite Duras Alberto Manguel
  • ISBN: 9780889104419
  • Page: 496
  • Format: Paperback
  • Contains two novellas The slut of the Normandy CoastThe Atlantic manandAn interview with Marguerite Duras by Ana Maria Moix An afterword by Alberto Manguel.

    • Best Read [Marguerite Duras Alberto Manguel] Î Two by Duras: The Slut of the Normandy Coast / The Atlantic Man || [Children's Book] PDF ☆
      496 Marguerite Duras Alberto Manguel
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Marguerite Duras Alberto Manguel] Î Two by Duras: The Slut of the Normandy Coast / The Atlantic Man || [Children's Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Marguerite Duras Alberto Manguel
      Published :2020-010-08T18:21:06+00:00

    About "Marguerite Duras Alberto Manguel"

      • Marguerite Duras Alberto Manguel

        Marguerite Donnadieu, better known as Marguerite Duras pronounced ma g it dy as in French April 4, 1914 March 3, 1996 was a French writer and film director.She was born at Gia Dinh, near Saigon, French Indochina now Vietnam , after her parents responded to a campaign by the French government encouraging people to work in the colony.Marguerite s father fell ill soon after their arrival, and returned to France, where he died After his death, her mother, a teacher, remained in Indochina with her three children The family lived in relative poverty after a bad investment in an isolated property and area of farmland in Cambodia t te de pisse The difficult life that the family experienced during this period was highly influential on Marguerite s later work.At 17, Marguerite went to France, her parents native country, where she began studying for a degree in mathematics This she soon abandoned to concentrate on political sciences, and then law After completing her studies, she became an active member of the PCF the French Communist Party and was engaged in the resistance.In 1943 she changed her surname to Duras for Duras, the name of a village in the Lot et Garonne d partement, where her father s house was located.She is the author of a great many novels, plays, films, interviews and short narratives, including her best selling, apparently autobiographical work L Amant 1984 , translated into English as The Lover This text won the Goncourt prize in 1984 The story of her adolescence also appears in three other forms The Sea Wall, Eden Cinema and The North China Lover A film version of The Lover, produced by Claude Berri, was released to great success in 1992.Other major works include Moderato Cantabile, also made into a film of the same name, Le Ravissement de Lol V Stein, and her film India Song She was also the screenwriter of the 1959 French film Hiroshima mon amour, which was directed by Alain Resnais.Duras s early novels were fairly conventional in form their romanticism was criticised by fellow writer Raymond Queneau however, with Moderato Cantabile she became experimental, paring down her texts to give ever increasing importance to what was not said She was associated with the Nouveau roman French literary movement, although did not definitively belong to any group Her films are also experimental in form, most eschewing synch sound, using voice over to allude to, rather than tell, a story over images whose relation to what is said may be or less tangential.Marguerite s adult life was somewhat difficult, despite her success as a writer, and she was known for her periods of alcoholism She died in Paris, aged 82 from throat cancer and is interred in the Cimeti re du Montparnasse Her tomb is marked simply MD.From


    748 Comments

    1. I find a one-sitting read to be good for my soul from time to time, as it was today when I picked up this very slender volume containing two short pieces by and an interview with Marguerite Duras. The two pieces are luminous, but the interview is the real gem. I love how her prose can be both spare and languorous at the same time. But I also love that her stories are deeply personal. They're not just stories she tells -- they belong to her utterly. I love this because that's the kind of writer I [...]


    2. 'They say it isn't true, but it is true. But misogyny is good, a positive thing for women. Yes, certainly, misogyny hides an indifference that is positive for us. It allows us to remain on the margins, to not take part in the game of the male, a game of power. For years now all male discourse has been one same discourse, repeated, repetitive, very much codified, saying one same thing. The only imaginative discourse today is the discourse of women.'


    3. I'm on a Duras bender-and everything I read keeps leading like a chain to her other work since she's so awfully fond of referencing her writing process in works like _Practicalities_ . This was no exception since these two itty bitty bits of writing- let's not dignify the publisher's fiction that this napkin-thin collection of pages of text with 2 inch borders and triple wide spacing are "novellas"-about you guessed it: writing. These two stories did zero for me. One is kind of about her relatio [...]


    4. The second in my consumption of Duras. "The Slut of the Normandy Coast" was quite entertaining and felt like a glimpse into the author's real life (though certainly shouldn't be taken at that face value). "The Atlantic Man" killed me. Yes, it just carved out a chunk and inserted itself into my core. It was at this point I realized I adore her style. I could compare it to others who hold stead in my soul (Paul Bowles, Wm Burroughs, Chuck Bukowski, Franz Kafka, Al Camus, etc), but those would only [...]


    5. i love marguerite duras. where mallarmé writes with smoke, she writes with 150 proof vapour. this is my first time reading late duras, i don't really know what i can write on two novellas about the impossibility of writing. she pulls it off beautifully. appreciated the inclusion of a short interview with the author.


    6. 3 for the first novella (read The Malady of Death for context). 4 for the second. 5 for the interview. 3 + 4 + 5 = 12 √∑ 3 = 4 (Fact: Duras studied mathematics before turning to writing.)



    Leave a Reply